Monday, December 22, 2014

AORA could brings hybrid solar power to off-grid locations



  
Solar energy is an ideal solution for the power needs of the developing world – except for one problem: It stops working when the sun goes down, at precisely the time power is needed to turn the lights on. The solution, according to Zev Rosenzweig, CEO of Israeli energy technology company AORA, is a hybrid system – one that utilizes solar to the fullest, and supplements it with a “backup” system to keep the power flowing when the sun is not high in the sky, using scant resources, with an operating cost of next to nothing.
It’s perfect for developing countries, said Rosenzweig – and after six years of research and pilot projects, and an investment of $40 million, AORA is ready for prime time, he said.
The company announced that it had signed a deal to build one of its Tulip solar-hybrid power plants in Ethiopia. “We are transforming our Green Economy Strategy into action and are pleased to partner with AORA to help achieve our vision,” said Alemayehu Tegenu, Minister of Water, Irrigation and Energy for Ethiopia. “AORA’s unique solar-hybrid technology is impressive and well-suited to provide both energy and heat to support local economic development in off-grid rural locations in Ethiopia.”
Solar Energy Local Power by AORA“Off-grid rural locations” are exactly the places Rosenzweig wants to see more Tulips installed. “Our hybrid system uses both solar power and biogas to operate a turbine, with the hot air moving the turbine to generate electricity.”
Enhancing the sunlight are a series of mirrors to heat compressed air to over 1800 degrees Fahrenheit and drive a turbine. When the sun goes down, the system moves seamlessly from solar to biogas in order to power the turbines, with the biogas derived from animal waste, biodiesel, natural gas – just about any material that can be burned for fuel.

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Ethiopian official denies dam-related financial woes | Africa | Worldbulletin News

thiopian official denies dam-related financial woes
Ethiopian official denies dam-related financial woes

Ethiopian official has denied claims that a multibillion dollar deal is facing financial problems and has said that the project will not encounter any such problems until its finalised.

World Bulletin/News Desk
 An Ethiopian official on Wednesday denied claims that a multibillion-dollar hydroelectric dam currently being constructed on the Nile River was facing financial problems.
"The project has never encountered any financial limitation," Fekadu Ketema, spokesman for the Office of the National Council for the Coordination of Public Participation on the Construction of the GrandEthiopian Renaissance Dam, told The Anadolu Agency.
"We can reaffirm that the project will never encounter financial constraint to the end," said Ketema.
Ethiopian authorities say the $6.4-billion dam project is meant to generate badly-need energy.
But the project has strained Ethiopia's relations with downstream Egypt, which fears the project will reduce its traditional share of Nile water.
Addis Ababa, for its part, insists the new dam will benefit downstream states Egypt and Sudan, both of which will be invited to purchase the electricity thus generated.
According to Ketema, 41 percent of the dam's construction has been completed.
"We are now disposing of 12 million cubic meters of earth and unnecessary scraps," he said, describing remaining construction work as an "easy task."
Ketema said public contributions to the project – which is due for completion in 2017 – amounted to 23 percent of total funds spent on the dam's construction.
He added that 85 percent of the dam's projected cost would be covered by the government, while the rest would be covered by proceeds from public bond sales and contributions.

Sunday, December 7, 2014

Security Message for U.S. Citizens: Addis Ababa (Ethiopia): Demonstrations & Travel Restrictions

Security Message for U.S. Citizens: Addis Ababa (Ethiopia): Demonstrations & Travel Restrictions



Africa > Ethiopia; Africa > Ethiopia > Addis Ababa



The U.S. Embassy informs U.S. citizens that political rallies or demonstrations may occur without significant notice throughout Ethiopia, particularly in the lead up to Ethiopian national elections in May 2015.  Such rallies and demonstrations may be organized by any party or group and can occur in any open space throughout the country.  In Addis Ababa, applications for permits to conduct rallies are often requested for Meskel Square or Bel Air Field.  Please remember that even public rallies or demonstrations intended to be peaceful have the potential to turn confrontational and escalate into violence.  You should, therefore, stay alert and avoid areas of demonstrations, and exercise caution if in the vicinity of any large gatherings, protests, or demonstrations.
The U.S. Embassy reminds U.S. citizens of the on-going threat of terrorist attacks in Ethiopia.  U.S. citizens are reminded and encouraged to maintain heightened personal security awareness.  Be especially vigilant in areas that are potential targets for attacks, particularly areas where U.S. and western citizens congregate, including restaurants, hotels, bars, places of worship, supermarkets, and shopping malls.  Al-Shabaab may have plans for a potential attack targeting Westerners and the Ethiopian government, particularly in Jijiga and Dolo Odo in the Somali Region of Ethiopia, and Addis Ababa.  Attacks may occur without warning.
Due to serious safety and security concerns, U.S. government personnel and their families are presently restricted from traveling to the following areas except as permitted on a case-by-case basis:
Ethiopian/Kenyan Border (Southern Ethiopia):  In southern Ethiopia along the Kenyan border, banditry and incidents involving ethnic conflicts are common.  Security around the town of Moyale is unpredictable, and clashes between Ethiopian forces and the Oromia Liberation Front (OLF) have been reported.
Ethiopia/Eritrea Border (Northern Ethiopia):  Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a peace agreement in December 2000 that ended their border war.  However, the border remains disputed.  The border area is a militarized zone where there is the possibility of armed conflict between Ethiopian and Eritrean forces.  U.S. government personnel are restricted from travel north of the Shire (Inda Silassie)-Axum-Adigrat road in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.  Personnel are further restricted from travel north of the road from Dessie through Semera to the Galafi border crossing with Djibouti, including the Danakil Depression and the Erta Ale volcano.  In January 2012, a group of foreign tourists were attacked near the Erta Ale volcano in the Afar region near the Eritrean border, approximately 100 miles southeast of Adigrat in the Danakil Depression.  The attack resulted in five deaths, three wounded, and four people kidnapped.  The victims were European and Ethiopian citizens.  The two Europeans who were kidnapped were subsequently released.  On February 15, 2012, Ethiopia, which blamed Eritrea for the attack, retaliated by striking military camps in Eritrea where the attackers were allegedly trained. This episode illustrates the continuing volatility of the border area.
Somali Region (Eastern Ethiopia):  Travel to Ethiopia's Somali regional state is restricted for U.S. government employees, although essential travel to the region is permitted on a case-by-case basis.  Since the mid-1990's, members of the Ogaden National Liberation Front (ONLF) have conducted attacks on civilian targets in parts of the Somali regional state, particularly in predominantly Ogadeni zones.  Expatriates have been killed in these attacks.  In 2010, the Government of Ethiopia initiated peace talks with the ONLF, which are ongoing.  Despite these talks, incidents of violence continue to occur.  Throughout 2013, skirmishes between the ONLF and regional government security forces took place.  Some of these incidents involved local civilians.  Al-Shabaab maintains a presence in Somali towns near the Ethiopian border, presenting a risk of cross-border attacks targeting foreigners.
Gambella Region (Western Ethiopia):  Sporadic inter-ethnic clashes are a concern throughout the Gambella region of western Ethiopia.  While the security situation in the town of Gambella is generally calm, it remains unpredictable throughout the rest of the region.  Intensified conflict between Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan (RSS) has significantly increased refugee flows into Western Ethiopia.  Travel to the border areas in the Beneshangul-Gumuz Region (Asosa) is restricted to major towns north of the area where the Great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) is being constructed due to political sensitivity.
We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Ethiopia enroll in the Department of State's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).  STEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates, and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency.  If you don't have Internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.
Regularly monitor the State Department's website, where you can find current Travel WarningsTravel Alerts, and the Worldwide Caution.  Read the Country Specific Information for Ethiopia.  For additional information, refer to the "Traveler's Checklist" on the State Department's website.
Contact the U.S. embassy or consulate for up-to-date information on travel restrictions. You can also call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).  Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to have travel information at your fingertips.


The U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa is located at Entoto Street, P.O. Box 1014.  The Consular Section of the Embassy may be reached by telephone: +251-111-306000 or e-mail at consacs@state.gov, and is open Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.  For after-hours emergencies, U.S. citizens should call +251-111-306911 or 011-130-6000 and ask to speak with the duty officer.

Security Message for U.S. Citizens: Addis Ababa (Ethiopia): Demonstrations & Travel Restrictions

Security Message for U.S. Citizens: Addis Ababa (Ethiopia): Demonstrations & Travel Restrictions



Africa > Ethiopia; Africa > Ethiopia > Addis Ababa



The U.S. Embassy informs U.S. citizens that political rallies or demonstrations may occur without significant notice throughout Ethiopia, particularly in the lead up to Ethiopian national elections in May 2015.  Such rallies and demonstrations may be organized by any party or group and can occur in any open space throughout the country.  In Addis Ababa, applications for permits to conduct rallies are often requested for Meskel Square or Bel Air Field.  Please remember that even public rallies or demonstrations intended to be peaceful have the potential to turn confrontational and escalate into violence.  You should, therefore, stay alert and avoid areas of demonstrations, and exercise caution if in the vicinity of any large gatherings, protests, or demonstrations.
The U.S. Embassy reminds U.S. citizens of the on-going threat of terrorist attacks in Ethiopia.  U.S. citizens are reminded and encouraged to maintain heightened personal security awareness.  Be especially vigilant in areas that are potential targets for attacks, particularly areas where U.S. and western citizens congregate, including restaurants, hotels, bars, places of worship, supermarkets, and shopping malls.  Al-Shabaab may have plans for a potential attack targeting Westerners and the Ethiopian government, particularly in Jijiga and Dolo Odo in the Somali Region of Ethiopia, and Addis Ababa.  Attacks may occur without warning.
Due to serious safety and security concerns, U.S. government personnel and their families are presently restricted from traveling to the following areas except as permitted on a case-by-case basis:
Ethiopian/Kenyan Border (Southern Ethiopia):  In southern Ethiopia along the Kenyan border, banditry and incidents involving ethnic conflicts are common.  Security around the town of Moyale is unpredictable, and clashes between Ethiopian forces and the Oromia Liberation Front (OLF) have been reported.
Ethiopia/Eritrea Border (Northern Ethiopia):  Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a peace agreement in December 2000 that ended their border war.  However, the border remains disputed.  The border area is a militarized zone where there is the possibility of armed conflict between Ethiopian and Eritrean forces.  U.S. government personnel are restricted from travel north of the Shire (Inda Silassie)-Axum-Adigrat road in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.  Personnel are further restricted from travel north of the road from Dessie through Semera to the Galafi border crossing with Djibouti, including the Danakil Depression and the Erta Ale volcano.  In January 2012, a group of foreign tourists were attacked near the Erta Ale volcano in the Afar region near the Eritrean border, approximately 100 miles southeast of Adigrat in the Danakil Depression.  The attack resulted in five deaths, three wounded, and four people kidnapped.  The victims were European and Ethiopian citizens.  The two Europeans who were kidnapped were subsequently released.  On February 15, 2012, Ethiopia, which blamed Eritrea for the attack, retaliated by striking military camps in Eritrea where the attackers were allegedly trained. This episode illustrates the continuing volatility of the border area.
Somali Region (Eastern Ethiopia):  Travel to Ethiopia's Somali regional state is restricted for U.S. government employees, although essential travel to the region is permitted on a case-by-case basis.  Since the mid-1990's, members of the Ogaden National Liberation Front (ONLF) have conducted attacks on civilian targets in parts of the Somali regional state, particularly in predominantly Ogadeni zones.  Expatriates have been killed in these attacks.  In 2010, the Government of Ethiopia initiated peace talks with the ONLF, which are ongoing.  Despite these talks, incidents of violence continue to occur.  Throughout 2013, skirmishes between the ONLF and regional government security forces took place.  Some of these incidents involved local civilians.  Al-Shabaab maintains a presence in Somali towns near the Ethiopian border, presenting a risk of cross-border attacks targeting foreigners.
Gambella Region (Western Ethiopia):  Sporadic inter-ethnic clashes are a concern throughout the Gambella region of western Ethiopia.  While the security situation in the town of Gambella is generally calm, it remains unpredictable throughout the rest of the region.  Intensified conflict between Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan (RSS) has significantly increased refugee flows into Western Ethiopia.  Travel to the border areas in the Beneshangul-Gumuz Region (Asosa) is restricted to major towns north of the area where the Great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) is being constructed due to political sensitivity.
We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Ethiopia enroll in the Department of State's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).  STEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates, and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency.  If you don't have Internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.
Regularly monitor the State Department's website, where you can find current Travel WarningsTravel Alerts, and the Worldwide Caution.  Read the Country Specific Information for Ethiopia.  For additional information, refer to the "Traveler's Checklist" on the State Department's website.
Contact the U.S. embassy or consulate for up-to-date information on travel restrictions. You can also call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).  Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to have travel information at your fingertips.


The U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa is located at Entoto Street, P.O. Box 1014.  The Consular Section of the Embassy may be reached by telephone: +251-111-306000 or e-mail at consacs@state.gov, and is open Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.  For after-hours emergencies, U.S. citizens should call +251-111-306911 or 011-130-6000 and ask to speak with the duty officer.

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Prof. Muse Tegegne has lectured sociology Change &  Liberation  in Europe, Africa and Americas. He has obtained  Doctorat es Science from the University of Geneva.   A PhD in Developmental Studies & ND in Natural Therapies.  He wrote on the  problematic of  the Horn of  Africa extensively. He Speaks Amharic, Tigergna, Hebrew, English, French. He has a good comprehension of Arabic, Spanish and Italian.